Films not dead. - F.N.D http://www.filmsnotdead.com - Film Photography Shop, Printroom & Blog Thu, 26 Mar 2015 10:43:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 52 Photo Tips #9: Use morning and evening light http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/25/52-photo-tips-9-use-morning-and-evening-light/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/25/52-photo-tips-9-use-morning-and-evening-light/#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 13:10:34 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=23005 Most photographers end up shooting the majority of their pics in bright sunlight. No great mystery there – we have our cameras with us when we’re on holiday or out on bright, sunny days. Photography needs light, and these conditions present us with a feast. But it’s not the best light for photography. Hard, overhead […]

The post 52 Photo Tips #9: Use morning and evening light appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>

© Charlie Abbiss

Most photographers end up shooting the majority of their pics in bright sunlight. No great mystery there – we have our cameras with us when we’re on holiday or out on bright, sunny days. Photography needs light, and these conditions present us with a feast.

But it’s not the best light for photography. Hard, overhead summer sun creates deep black shadows – great, perhaps, if you’re shooting a colourful street scene, but ugly if you’re attempting portraits; the overhead sun creates hard blacks even under eye sockets.

Pro photographers almost never shoot in these conditions unless they can do so in open shade. Instead, they get up early or wait until the sun starts sinking. You should try doing the same.

Early morning and late afternoon sunlight is a much richer source of light. As the sun rises or sinks, its light has to pass through more of the Earth’s atmosphere. That means there’s a lot more dust and haze to get in the way. This refraction results in much warmer light, which gives off mired and gold times compared to the harder, bluer light of noon. The position of the sun also lengthens shadows and the angles accentuates texture.

The benefits of shooting in such light also extends to digital, but for film photographers this lighting really adds extra depth to colour film, in particular colour negative.

© Stephen Dowling. Late afternoon light can make ordinary photos much more impressive

Faster films, like Fuji Superia 400 or Kodak Tri-X, bring atmospheric grain, as well as accentuating grain.

The best hours to shoot change depending on where you are and what season it is. But in summer, a good rule of thumb is to avoid that hard light around midday – if you’re determined to shoot between 11am and 3pm, do it in open shade rather than out in the full light.

Out in the morning, the light develops, so 100 or 200 speed film is fine… But in the evening having a roll of 400 ISO film might be a good idea, especially if you’re handholding. It might make all the difference in capturing the last of that rich, red light.

© Charlie Abbiss

 

More articles from the series:

The post 52 Photo Tips #9: Use morning and evening light appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/25/52-photo-tips-9-use-morning-and-evening-light/feed/ 0
Jaw Dropping Pinhole Camera http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/18/the-jaw-operated-pinhole-camera/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/18/the-jaw-operated-pinhole-camera/#comments Wed, 18 Mar 2015 09:14:08 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=22913 Have you ever wanted to try a completely new perpespective in the way you take your photographs or have you been trying to shoot complete strangers in the street but can’t seem to find the courage to do it? Well, photographer Nicholas Williams has come up with a very unique solution to this problem, he […]

The post Jaw Dropping Pinhole Camera appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>

Have you ever wanted to try a completely new perpespective in the way you take your photographs or have you been trying to shoot complete strangers in the street but can’t seem to find the courage to do it?

Well, photographer Nicholas Williams has come up with a very unique solution to this problem, he decided to use his face to hold his handmade camera, which he has aptly named the jaw operated pinhole camera!

He told TIME, “As a street photographer it can be kind of intimidating bringing the camera up to your face to make a picture, so I thought I‘d put the camera on my face.”

William’s constructed his basic camera using everyday household items; a matchbox, a tin can and some cheap twine. It works by wrapping the twine around his camera, forehead and jaw, from that William’s is able to control his exposures by simply opening and closing his mouth.

Last July, the photographer visited New York City to try his homemade camera in a brand-new environment. “The camera sort of acted as a mask, people don’t pay attention to you in New York City if you’re doing something strange, most people didn’t even seem to notice me at all.”

Back in Ann Arbor, where Williams is a student at the University of Michigan, people’s reactions were polar opposites. “I stood over a girl and attempted to make a test photograph, but she ran off leaving her books and bag behind,” he says. When Williams later approached her, she told him she actually believed that the camera attached to his face was a bomb!

This summer, the jaw-operated pinhole camera will be back on Williams’ face as he plans to travel to Ireland and use it again, this time to make colour photographs, we can’t wait to see the results from that.


© Nicholas Williams © Nicholas Williams © Nicholas Williams © Nicholas Williams © Nicholas Williams © Nicholas Williams

Information: TIME Lightbox 

All images © Nicholas Williams

Instagram / Tumblr

The post Jaw Dropping Pinhole Camera appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/18/the-jaw-operated-pinhole-camera/feed/ 0
52 Photo Tips #8 – Learn the Sunny 16 rule http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/14/52-photo-tips-8-learn-the-sunny-16-rule/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/14/52-photo-tips-8-learn-the-sunny-16-rule/#comments Sat, 14 Mar 2015 12:13:19 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=22849 Spare a thought for the film photographers from decades past, learning their way without all the helping hands we take for granted today. Few cameras – except the most expensive – had any kind of meter built in. Photographers, if they had the money, had to make do with handheld meters (if they could afford […]

The post 52 Photo Tips #8 – Learn the Sunny 16 rule appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>

Spare a thought for the film photographers from decades past, learning their way without all the helping hands we take for granted today. Few cameras – except the most expensive – had any kind of meter built in. Photographers, if they had the money, had to make do with handheld meters (if they could afford one) or guess the exposure.

This was easier said than done considering many cheaper cameras had only a few speeds and apertures. Photography with the likes of a Kodak Brownie or an Agfa Clack could feel like guesswork. But there as a simple trick for taking perfectly exposed pics. And it’s something that still works a treat today.

The Sunny 16 rule might be the simplest piece of technical advice you can learn in photography. What’s more, it’s pretty much foolproof.

Sunny 16 is a mathematical equation that allows you to expose properly in outdoor lightning conditions. The rule means that for bright sunny weather – the kind you’re likely to find on your summer holidays, when most people were taking photographs – you set the aperture to f16 and the shutter speed as close to the ISO of the film you are shooting with; if you have 100 speed film, set the camera’s speed to the 1/125th. If your film is ISO 200, set the shutter speed to 1/250th. “Sunny weather” means bright sunshine with clear and distinct shadows.

The Sunny 16 rule doesn’t end there; the right exposure for other lighting conditions can also be worked out – right down to overcast days. The table below gives a good indication.

 

Sunny
Deep shadows
Hazy Sun
Soft Shadows
Cloudy
Faint shadows
Overcast
No shadows
F-Stop / 16 / 11 / 8 / 5.6
ISO 100 1/125 1/125 1/125 1/125
ISO 200 1/250 1/250 1/250 1/250
ISO 400 1/500 1/500 1/500 1/500
ISO 800 1/1000 1/1000 1/1000 1/1000

The Sunny 16 rule might seem archaic given that, with a few clicks, a light meter app can be downloaded for your smartphone. But learning it allows you to understand light, and confidently expose for the conditions. And getting the exposure right is often half the battle.

In bright sunshine, where your subject isn’t hidden in shade, the Sunny 16 rule will stand you in pretty good stead.

But it’s also a brilliant tool for shooting on overcast days. Living in London, I see a lot more of those than I do sizzlingly sunny ones.

 

Because Sunny 16 is a basic mathematical rule, it is predictable – and flexible. The above shot was taken on 400 ISO film rated at 3200; that means it’s pushed three stops and needs either a shutter speed three times faster, or an aperture stopped down three extra stops…. I double-checked with a handheld meter, but my basic calculation was pretty much on the money. Sunny 16, it turns out, is Cloudy 16 too!

 

 

More articles from the series:

The post 52 Photo Tips #8 – Learn the Sunny 16 rule appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/14/52-photo-tips-8-learn-the-sunny-16-rule/feed/ 0
FOCUSED…..Taylor Pool http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/12/focused-taylor-pool/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/12/focused-taylor-pool/#comments Thu, 12 Mar 2015 10:45:55 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=22833 Today on our FOCUSED series we’re very excited to have photographer Taylor Pool! Pool has a love for everything analogue from developing his own films to hand printing all his own work, shooting promptly with either a Rolleiflex or Mamiya RZ67 on black and white film. His work concentrates on taking mainly portraits of people who […]

The post FOCUSED…..Taylor Pool appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
© Taylor Pool

Today on our FOCUSED series we’re very excited to have photographer Taylor Pool!

Pool has a love for everything analogue from developing his own films to hand printing all his own work, shooting promptly with either a Rolleiflex or Mamiya RZ67 on black and white film.

His work concentrates on taking mainly portraits of people who he encounters on his journeys, he believes that it ‘is an act of honor and justice. Being able to show that they are worthy of a photograph portraying the realism of their life and environment; not hiding anything to the viewer or the outside world.’

We caught up with Pool to find out more about his work:

Film’s Not Dead:  Could you start off by telling us a bit about yourself and how your love for photography began?

Taylor Pool: I remember my love for photography began when a friends mom gave me a very old and small digital camera. I was 13 or 14 at the time and took it to a concert with me and couldn’t stop taking photos of the band. I’m sure I was a bit annoying. My grandfather found out that I was using this camera a lot and that summer when I visited him in Texas he gave me his Canon T50, a film camera that he used to travel around Europe and the States with. I couldn’t believe it! At this point and time this camera seemed to be a lot of worth, not knowing a lot about cameras. From that point on I “seriously” pursued photography at that age by constantly being in my backyard and taking photos of insects, animals, plants, then moving onto bands and concerts. Then two years later a friend from Oklahoma switched to digital photography and sent me his Canon A2 as a surprise gift and encouragement to keep pursuing photography more seriously.

Film’s Not Dead:  Looking through your work it’s clear to see you’re a fan of using medium format cameras. Why do you decide to particularly work with the Rolleiflex and Mamiya RZ67?

Taylor Pool: That’s a great question. I actually used small format for 5-6 years or so, until I was 20. Then when I moved to Germany and after a year of being in Germany all my friends were using Hasselblads and Mamiyas and it really made me curious as to what the difference of medium format film is to small format, why do they use it, pro’s and con’s and all that stuff.

Then there came a point when I was 21 I felt like it was time to grow in my photography and take a challenge and “step up” to a new level, so I pursued medium format. Found a Mamiya RZ67 on Ebay and it was gifted to me fortunately enough!

Since then I haven’t regretted using medium format.More details, more depth, more emotion in every photo.

Film’s Not Dead: Travelling is a big part of your work, you’ve travelled to Ethiopia, London, Romania. How do you decide which places to travel to, is there a specific assignment your going out there for or do you find something when your there?

Taylor Pool: Travelling is not only a big part of my work but it’s a big part of my lifestyle.

In 2008 when I moved to Germany I joined an organization who train people to use arts on the field, in different countries, to help others and raise awareness of what’s happening in the world. Therefore, wherever I travel is for a specific purpose. I rarely travel out of my own personal curiosity. I usually travel because my team or colleagues have a vision to do some kind of work in “this or that” country.

I’ve worked a lot in Ethiopia, I was actually just there mid February for 10 days, because in 2009 a group of people I was with started a relief ministry to help teens find a better and healthier lifestyle than they were living. Since 2008 I’ve been back 5 times to continue to work with what we started.

A few years back my team did a 2 week journey through Eastern Europe because we wanted to work with the Roma people in Romania and also visit this arts district in Ljubljana, Slovenia. That trip was absolutely 100% spontaneous and unplanned. We had no contacts nor friends in Slovania, Romania, Croatia, Hungary, etc to help us with housing or anything. But what I found there, photography and people wise, was one of the best things. I haven’t been back to Sighsoara, Romania since then, but my dream is to go back to one of the roma villages and to offer free family portraits to all the families there. If you’re able to take their family portrait it’s a treasure to them. Their extreme living conditions cause them to not have that long of a life span. At times families will have 6-9 children knowing not all of them will survive, so taking a family portrait of them will help them to remember all their family members for a long long time.

Film’s Not Dead: What’s your typical start up for shooting?

Taylor Pool: My typical start up for shooting is simply me going out with my camera and waiting to meet people who catch my eye or make a relational impact with me. All my photos from my “Stranger” series is with the Rolleiflex. Since the Rollei is so portable and small, I’m able to always have it in my arms as I walk and if I see someone I need to take a photo of then I ask them or try to start a conversation. Often people come to me because they see my old camera and ask me questions about it. So it’s half and half of me going to people and people coming to me.

Film’s Not Dead: Looking through your work, it’s clear you see the world in black & white. Why do you decide to shoot in black & white than colour?

Taylor Pool: I love shooting black and white because I can work with my hands more than I can with color, and it makes me feel more that I am actually creating something. With b/w film I can develop them myself in my bathroom, then take them to the darkroom to print. The entire time working with my hands and producing something physical. When I came to Germany in 2008, the training course I was a part of for 6 months also taught me strictly on black and white film and paper development. They taught me a lot of values as to why black and white is so personal and important and I found I agreed with a lot of their teachings.

Film’s Not Dead: Use one word to describe your style of photography?

Taylor Pool: People.

Film’s Not Dead: What is it that makes you want to shoot on film?

Taylor Pool: For me film becomes a personal issue. If you decide to take a photo of someone with film, then it’s personal and it means something, because film actually costs you something, and it’s expensive! With digital it’s hard to make things personal because it doesn’t cost you anything. Buy one SD card and you can take photos of whoever you want. With film you have to be picky. That’s why I shoot film because it allows me to become personal with my subjects and picky with who I choose, therefore making the photographs more special. I love that I am not able to take photos of everyone. I love that I have a strong say in who and what goes into a roll of film. That’s what makes a roll of film so special because I know I have chosen wisely and not just captured snapshots, but something more meaningful.

Film’s Not Dead: If you could give one piece of advise to an inspiring photographer, what would that be?

Taylor Pool: Your first 100,000 photographs are just the beginning. I read a quote like that a long time ago and I couldn’t agree more. I remember my first two years of shooting in my backyard and shooting concerts and I didn’t really like my photography. Then after 2 or 3 years I actually started to like my photography; after 100s of rolls of film and money down the drain. Photography takes sacrifice, and if you’re wanting to be great, then you’ll need to sacrifice a lot of time, money, patience, and comfort in order to be great. Be flexible and have fun as well. Don’t always be serious with photography. Make sure that you make your photography enjoyable and not always a task on your to-do list.

Film’s Not Dead: What are your plans for this year. Do you have any projects/exhibitions lined up that we should look out for?

Taylor Pool: Right now I am currently working towards printing 10-15 Stranger photos in the darkroom for a (hopeful) exhibition in Nuremberg, Germany where I currently reside. This Fall I will also be part of a collaborative exhibition with my team where we will showcase the story of a childrens home that we will visit in India this Spring. I will be traveling to India in Spring and hopefully to Eastern Europe this Fall, and somewhere in the year find a showcase for my Stranger series.

Film’s Not Dead: Thank you for taking the time to do this interview with us. Is there anything else you’d like to say to the readers of Film’s Not Dead?

Taylor Pool: I love talking to people and sharing each others passions, dreams, ideas, and artwork. Please message me if you want to share anything. I’m on Instagram, FB, and have a website. Let’s connect! I always am looking to be inspired by others and I want to hear why others create art.

© Taylor Pool © Taylor Pool © Taylor Pool © Taylor Pool © Taylor Pool © Taylor Pool © Taylor Pool

The post FOCUSED…..Taylor Pool appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/12/focused-taylor-pool/feed/ 0
Nobuyuki Kobayashi: Portrait of Nature – Myriads of Gods http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/11/nobuyuki-kobayashi-portrait-of-nature-myriads-of-gods/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/11/nobuyuki-kobayashi-portrait-of-nature-myriads-of-gods/#comments Wed, 11 Mar 2015 12:04:01 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=20982 Platinum palladium printing is probably one of my favourite photographic processes as the results one can achieve from this process is beyond words. Producing one of the greatest tonal ranges out of all photographic printing techniques. The unique quality with Platinum printing is that the platinum tones range from warm black, to reddish brown, to expanded […]

The post Nobuyuki Kobayashi: Portrait of Nature – Myriads of Gods appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>

Platinum palladium printing is probably one of my favourite photographic processes as the results one can achieve from this process is beyond words. Producing one of the greatest tonal ranges out of all photographic printing techniques. The unique quality with Platinum printing is that the platinum tones range from warm black, to reddish brown, to expanded mid-tone grays which are unobtainable in silver prints, hence why many photographers use it to archive their work as well as being highly recognised among collectors.

It’s said that given the right paper and storage that these prints can live on for over a 1000 years!

Japanese photographer Nobuyuki Kobayashi has been practicing the art of Platinum printing for many years and through this 30 minute video it shows us an in-depth look into this technique and his true love and dedictation for the medium.

Kobayashi uses a beautiful 8×10 large format camera as well as printing on traditional Japanese paper, called washi. He choose this type of paper as, ‘Photographing techniques originated from Europe. I want to add a Japanese identity to my work…’

Listen to Kobayashi describe this project ‘Portraits of Nature – Myriads of Gods on Platinum Palladium Prints’ in the documentary below, it will give you a glimpse into his work flow and how he manages to produce such exquisite prints.

© Nobuyuki Kobayashi

 

The post Nobuyuki Kobayashi: Portrait of Nature – Myriads of Gods appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/11/nobuyuki-kobayashi-portrait-of-nature-myriads-of-gods/feed/ 0
52 Photo Tips #7: Try Cross-Processing http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/09/52-photo-tips-7-try-cross-processing/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/09/52-photo-tips-7-try-cross-processing/#comments Mon, 09 Mar 2015 09:47:55 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=22791 Cross-processing is one of the easiest film experiments you can try. What it involves is taking a film and getting it developed in the chemicals used for another photographic process. The most common cross-processing technique is to take slide film (E6 process) and develop it in the chemicals used for colour negatives (C-41). Cross-processing creates warped […]

The post 52 Photo Tips #7: Try Cross-Processing appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
tarifa_lines_web

Grain and deep blues in tarifa, Spain, on a Lomo LC-Wide and Agfa CT100 Precisa

Cross-processing is one of the easiest film experiments you can try. What it involves is taking a film and getting it developed in the chemicals used for another photographic process.

The most common cross-processing technique is to take slide film (E6 process) and develop it in the chemicals used for colour negatives (C-41). Cross-processing creates warped colours, boosts contrast and adds grain. It’s a process that creates incredibly saturated, eye-catching pictures.

In the days long before Instagram, it was cross-processing that made such a star of the humble Lomo LC-A, and spawned the analogue movement Lomography. The Lomo’s saturated lens and tendency to vignette made it perfectly suited to the lurid colours and atmospheric, heightened grain.

Cross-processing – using more sophisticated cameras – was a hallmark of edgier fashion and music photography aswell, lending un-natural colour tones. Like the filters found on apps such as Instagram, it’s not a technique that works 100% of the time – shooting colour slide xpro in dull weather can be more miss-than-hit – but at its best it can breathe new life into your photography.

The only problem is – slide film is very much on the wane. Fuji is the only major film manufacturer still bothering to make new slide film, and that slide film is expensive – in the UK a roll of it is likely to cost you at least £10. And Fuji’s Provia and Velvia films, the last they are making, look much better shot normally than they do cross-processed; Provia picks up a nasty lurid green tone and Velvia tends to show up a strong magenta/purple cast.

They’re a long way from the results you can get with the two films that really came alive with cross-processing. One of these was the original Agfa CT100 Precisa, a consumer-grade slide film made by the German film manufacturer until around 2006 but was then later repackaged as Fuji Provia which is what you see on the market today, averaging at about £6/7 a roll, great if you want to shoot slide on a budget. When cross-processed Precisa looks amazing – blues become super-saturated, reds shine, grain is boosted and shadows become deep and rich. The next best is Kodak Elite Chrome 100, another film where colour and grain are boosted. Elite Chrome was discontinued in 2011. Apart from one brand of Lomography slide film – rebadged Agfa RSX200 – things have looked grim for those wanting to evoke that early 90s Lomo look.

5529034135_16b5870194_b

Olympus XA and Agfaphoto CT100, another home-scanning job to bring down the green

Until last year. Italian film manufacturer Ferrania announced it is returning to making film, and the first film it will return with is a 100 ISO slide film – the film that used to be called Scotch Chrome. It’s another film that cross-processed well, boosting blues and grain. It will be a few months before the films are available in the shops, but it gives cross-processing a much-needed boost in the arm.

If you’re wanting to try cross-processing, here’s a few tips and tricks…

Make sure the lab knows they’re xpro: Without instructions, a lab will process films normally. So label them clearly, either xpro or C-41. Most labs will do this, though they may charge you a little extra.

Get it scanned: Scanning your own film brings down the cost, and gives you ultimate control. I scan all my films – except xpro. The minilab scanners do such a great job of capturing those warped colours that there’s no point. You can spend a lot of time with a scanner and Photoshop trying to get it looking right, and chances are the lab is always going to do a better job.

 

14755640095_6b07f42acf_o

Original Agfa CT100 Precisa ona Zenit E… notice how deep the blues and blacks are…

Ebay is your friend: Kodak Elite Chrome may not be made any more, but it still crops up on everyone’s favourite internet auction site. Even the old-school Precisa – though you have to do a little bit of detective work to make sure you’re buying the right kind. Fuji has rebadged some of its Provia film as “Agfaphoto CT100 Precisa” which goes a grim kind of green when cross-processed. Look for a “Useby:” date of before 2008, but more importantly a box that has “Agfa” on it and the old-school Agfa diamond logo (even more cofusingly, there were batches of the old school film that was packaged in the new boxes – check this excellent post on Flickr to find out if you’ve found some of them). It still crops up. Kodak Elite Chrome, and the pro-level Ektachrome is more common. Snap them up.

Xpro loves light: Just like when you’re using expired film, xpro wants light – sunlight or artificial light it doesn’t matter (and yes, the flash on your camera counts). To make the most of the warped colours, those colours need to be saturated. Dull, overcast days? Don’t shoot xpro. Save it for a day when you can make those colours pop.

 

More articles from the series:

The post 52 Photo Tips #7: Try Cross-Processing appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/09/52-photo-tips-7-try-cross-processing/feed/ 0
Teaching Literacy & Maths through pinholes! http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/05/teaching-maths-english-through-pinholes/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/05/teaching-maths-english-through-pinholes/#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 10:34:40 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=22780   At school I always hated maths and constiently struggled with it, it never engaged me. Yet wouldn’t it be lovely if you could learn the subjects most kids find boring in a physical and creative way? When we came across this project that David Kendall (director of Fotosynethesis – a non profit organisation that […]

The post Teaching Literacy & Maths through pinholes! appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>

 

At school I always hated maths and constiently struggled with it, it never engaged me. Yet wouldn’t it be lovely if you could learn the subjects most kids find boring in a physical and creative way? When we came across this project that David Kendall (director of Fotosynethesis – a non profit organisation that specialises in allowing people to develop their creative skills in photography) sent this idea over to us, we fell in love with it.

Using the most basic form of photography to build on children’s numeracy and literacy skills, Fotosynthesis are planning on teaching 16 different primary schools in Brixton using pinhole photography. The children will be able to learn how to build a camera from nothing, take photographs using their handmade cameras as well as have the opportunity to use a darkroom. This idea needs some help though to get it off the ground; Fotosynthesis have set up a campaign on Indiegogo to help pay for the equipment and assistant facilitator.

This is a great opportunity for children to build their own pinhole cameras as well as develop and understand how to process a handmade photograph. Photosynthesis are planning on building 8 pop-up photo darkrooms in schools and introduce children to the magic of pinhole photography!

Their aim is to: “We want to deliver 64 practical ‘Literacy & Maths through Photography’ workshops to children in 16 primary schools in Brixton, South London. 500 children from different economic and ethnic backgrounds will benefit from the project in the 1st year. 

Using photography as an integral tool this project aims to support the inclusive development of literacy, speech and language and maths in all children irrespective of their learning and linguistic abilities.”

You can support this fantastic project by clicking here.

 

Indiegogo

The post Teaching Literacy & Maths through pinholes! appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/03/05/teaching-maths-english-through-pinholes/feed/ 0
52 Photo Tips #6: Pushing film – Stephen Dowling http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/28/52-photo-tips-6-pushing-film-stephen-dowling/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/28/52-photo-tips-6-pushing-film-stephen-dowling/#comments Sat, 28 Feb 2015 07:47:54 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=22741 Push processing is one of the film photographer’s secret weapons. It’s a useful trick when you suddenly find you need to use higher shutter speeds to capture action, or find yourself in lower light than expected. It allows you to use faster shutter speeds – meaning pictures won’t be blurred or underexposed – and increases […]

The post 52 Photo Tips #6: Pushing film – Stephen Dowling appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
Pushed Kodak Tri-X 400 to 800

Pushed Kodak Tri-X 400 to 800

Push processing is one of the film photographer’s secret weapons. It’s a useful trick when you suddenly find you need to use higher shutter speeds to capture action, or find yourself in lower light than expected. It allows you to use faster shutter speeds – meaning pictures won’t be blurred or underexposed – and increases grain, which can add bags of atmosphere. Pushing film/ uprating also produces more contrast and increases the effective sensitivity of your film too, allowing you to shoot well into night fall!

Pushing film involves when one goes to develop their film you simply give it more time in the developer as the technique is overdeveloping the film compensating for the underexposure in the camera.

As long as your camera allows you to manually change your film speed rating, push-processing is easy to do. It means changing the ISO rating on your camera so that the camera thinks it’s shooting a faster-speed film. So if you have a roll of 100-speed film, you set the camera’s meter to 200, or 400. Or if you have 400-speed film, uprating the meter to 800 or 1600 is also a tried-and-tested trick.

It’s one of the easiest film experiments to try out, though for best results there’s a few things to remember.

Label them – immediately: Pushing film will only work if the lab knows that that’s your intent. Changing the meter means you’ll be using faster shutter speeds, which means the film is exposed for less time. This means the film will need longer development times. If you don’t label the film that it needs to be uprated, you’ll get negs that are horribly underexposed. The more the film has been pushed, the worse this will be. So label them, as soon as you’ve shot the roll – a pack of stickers are always in my camera bag for just this reason.

Mark the film speed as soon as you’ve taken the film out of the camera. That way you don’t have the frustrating problem of trying to work which of the rolls you’ve shot on a weekend or a trip away that needed to be uprated…

Most labs will do this, perhaps with a small extra charge. If your lab doesn’t – find one that does. They deserve your custom.

Scanned Image 14

Pushed T-Max 100 to 400

Meter for highlights: When you push film, you increase the grain, those speckles that add atmosphere to film pictures (and look so much better than digital noise) . If you concentrate too much on the shadows, you turn what should be pitch, rich blacks into something greyer; the lack of contrast can make shadows look milky and indistinct. Metering for the brighter parts of the scene will make sure that the shadows remain nice and dark.

Push fresh film: New film is the best to push. I’m a big fan of using expired film, but unless the film has been fridge- or freezer-stored you might find the results lack contrast and depth. Shoot expired film box speed until you’re confident it’s giving consistent results. When pushing  colour film it can result in more saturation and distorted colours as well as more grain.

One thing you really can’t do is change your ISO halfway through your film. In some cases people have done this and I’ve seen the results of a darkroom printer actually process half the roll for the selected time and the other side the extra required time. Surprisingly it works, if it’s in the right hands, yet I wouldn’t recommend this.

Limit the amount it travels: Airport x-rays fritz film, and they fritz faster film a lot quicker than slow ISO film. If you push process film away from home, bear in mind you’re also making it more susceptible to fogging from x-ray radiation. One or two passes probably won’t hurt (as long as it’s fresh film) but if you’re taking film through more, you might want to wait until the end of the trip before you start uprating – either buy fresh film on location to push, or leaving it at the normal speed until the last minute.

Some films push better: Black and white film is by far the best to push. King of them all is Kodak’s Tri-X, which has changed little since it came out in the 1950s. I’ve had fantastic results with this 400-speed film rated at anything up to 6400; the characteristic ‘chalk-and-charcoal’ bright whites and deep blacks are retained.

John Convertino of Calexico at Brighton soundcheck, shot on a Nikon FM2N and Fuji Neopan rated at 6400 © Stephen Dowling

A great example of a push processing situation that you must check out is John Alcott won an Oscar “ for his gorgeous use of natural lighting” in Stanley Kubrick’s 18th century period film Barry Lyndon, in which he succeeded in filming scenes lit only by candlelight through the use of “special lenses designed by NASA for low-light shooting on moon landings” and push processing the film stock.

My Soundcheck Sessions project (shown above) has been shot mostly on the now sadly defunct Fuji Neopan, a 400-speed film pushed to 6400. It’s another film that keeps it characteristics with careful developing. Though the film is no longer available, you must still be able to find the last few rolls in a local camera store or on eBay.

Other films might suit your style. The only way to find out is to experiment!

 

More articles from the series:

The post 52 Photo Tips #6: Pushing film – Stephen Dowling appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/28/52-photo-tips-6-pushing-film-stephen-dowling/feed/ 0
Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840 – 1860 – Tate Britain http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/25/salt-and-silver-early-photography-1840-1860-tate-britain/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/25/salt-and-silver-early-photography-1840-1860-tate-britain/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 12:35:26 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=20705 25th February – 7th June 2015 Tate Britain Millbank London SW1P 4RG United Kingdom Opening times: Every day, 10.00–18.00 Admission: Adult £12.00 (without donation £10.90) Concession £10.50 (without donation £9.50) For further information: +44 (0)20 7887 8888/visiting.britain@tate.org.uk Opening it’s doors today ‘Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840 – 1860′ is a rare treat, a display of exquisite salt prints from the 19th Century. This is […]

The post Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840 – 1860 – Tate Britain appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
Jean Baptiste Frenet women-and-girls-doll © Wilson Centre for Photography

Jean Baptiste Frenet women and girls doll © Wilson Centre for Photography

25th February – 7th June 2015

Tate Britain Millbank
London SW1P 4RG United Kingdom

Opening times: Every day, 10.00–18.00

Admission: Adult £12.00 (without donation £10.90)
Concession £10.50 (without donation £9.50)

For further information: +44 (0)20 7887 8888/visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Opening it’s doors today ‘Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840 – 1860′ is a rare treat, a display of exquisite salt prints from the 19th Century. This is a very exciting exhibition as it’s the first exhibition in Britain devoted to salted paper prints, one of the earliest forms of photography that was pioneered in Britian. This unique process was invented by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1839, from which the salt print process spread across the globe, creating a new visual language of the modern moment.

The show contains a wide range of prints from an array of different photographers such as Talbot, Baldus, Nègre, Nadar, Salzmann and Fenton as well as some lesser known names. It has been curated by Carol Jacobi (Curator of British Art 1850–1915) and Simon Baker (Photography International Art) in collaboration with the Wilson Centre for Photography.

 

This revolutionary photographic process transformed subjects, still lifes, portraits, landscapes and scenes of daily life into images. It brings it’s own luxurious aesthetic, soft textures, matt appearance and deep rich red tones, the variations seen throughout this exhibition is fascinating to observe. It’s also an incredible opportunity to view the original prints in an exhibition format, which has never been done before on a scale like this before.

The process starts with dipping writing paper in a solution of common salt, then partly drying it, coating it with silver nitrate, then drying it again, before applying further coats of silver nitrate, William Henry Fox Talbot pioneered what became known as the salt print and the world’s first photographic print! The specifically soft and luxurious aesthetic became an icon of modern visual language.

The few salt prints that survive are rarely seen due to their fragility. This exhibition is extremely important to recognise this historical process as well as a fantastic opportunity to see the rarest and best up close of early photographs of this type in the world.

Jean-Baptiste Frénet, Horse and Groom, 1855 © Wilson Centre for Photography Roger Fenton, Captain Mottram Andrews, 28th Regiment (1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot, 1855 © Wilson Centre for Photography Jean-Baptiste Frénet, Women and girls with a doll, circa 1855 © Wilson Centre for Photography D. O. Hill and Robert Adamson, Newhaven fishermen, circa 1845 © Wilson Centre for Photography John Wheeley Gough Gutch Abbey Ruins, circa 1858 © Wilson Centre for Photography 2

 

 Tate Britain 

Images courtesy Tate Britain © Wilson Centre for Photography

The post Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840 – 1860 – Tate Britain appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/25/salt-and-silver-early-photography-1840-1860-tate-britain/feed/ 0
Denton Camera Exchange http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/19/denton-camera-exchange/ http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/19/denton-camera-exchange/#comments Thu, 19 Feb 2015 10:20:55 +0000 http://www.filmsnotdead.com/?p=20976   When you think of Texas the stereotypical thought is real cowboys, vast land, large lakes and Longhorn Cattle. So we were surprised to learn upon watching this 5 minute clip that Armand Kohandani opend up, Denton Camera Exchange. It’s the only camera retail outlet in Denton, Texas, a city of around 110,000 people and the […]

The post Denton Camera Exchange appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
 

photo

The outside of Denton Camera Exchange

When you think of Texas the stereotypical thought is real cowboys, vast land, large lakes and Longhorn Cattle. So we were surprised to learn upon watching this 5 minute clip that Armand Kohandani opend up, Denton Camera Exchange. It’s the only camera retail outlet in Denton, Texas, a city of around 110,000 people and the 27th most populous city in Texas.

In the video below Kohandani explains how he came to make his camera store by buying some inventory with a loan from his father, and how he’s trying to preserve the unique history of film photography.

“There’s lots of folks out there that don’t even know that film is still available, and it surprises them that I still carry it.”

Information: ISO 1200

The post Denton Camera Exchange appeared first on Films not dead. - F.N.D.

]]>
http://www.filmsnotdead.com/2015/02/19/denton-camera-exchange/feed/ 0